The 10in10in10 Challenge – Week 7 Report (Down 2.75 or -6.75/10)

For those new to this blog, I and a bunch of other tweethletes embarked upon this year’s 10in10 challenge, with the outcome goal to lose 10 pounds in 10 weeks. This report covers progress through week 7 of 10.

How’d I do? (The Outcome Goal) The bagel week. This was a crazy week and the bottom line is that I ate too much and worked out too inconsistently. The result is that I lost another 2.75 pounds. Hunh? Proves yet again that this weight management stuff is highly irregular, the benefits are cumulative and not even close to linear. I’m down to 209.75 pounds which is really exciting but I can’t say that it’s due to a great week on my part. Only tangentially related to my weight loss objective, my athletic performance continues to climb, including having paced out a 16-miler at a 9 min/mile pace, which isn’t fast historically but it’s the fastest I’ve run distance in quite some time.

I use three levels of performance measures. Less than Expected, Met Expectations and Exceeded Expectations. My grade?

Less than Expected Overall, for week 7 of 10 I gave myself a self assessment of Less than Expected. How can I say that when I had my largest weight loss week to date? Because the focus must remain oon the process goals if I am meant to achieve the objective and then sustain it after the fact. I’m totally supportive of the motivational mantra of celebrating small victories but I can’t let the variability of the outcome goal give me a false sense of productivity. With some significant changes to my routine coming up, I really need to step it up this week.

Report Card – Week 7

February 15 – February 21:


The chart above is created using Joe’s Goals.

Caloric Intake/Nutrition = Less than Expected

Portion size: Actually pretty good this week.

Eat Healthy Breakfast: I’m not sure about healthy but I ate breakfast most days.

Eat light every three hours: Think this stretched to four, five or even six on some days.

Eat fresh whole foods: Good. Salads almost every day.

Avoid junk food and sugar: Ice cream a few times this week. Just silly on my part.

Eat protein first: Sort of.

Stop eating 60 mins. before going to sleep: Crappy as all get out, eating too late almost every night.

Caloric Expenditure/Positive Stress = Less than Expected

February 15 – February 21:



Workouts captured on Buckeye Outdoors, a free online training log.

Workout early: Finally got out for a 5:30am run this week, but only once. Still having trouble waking up full of energy.

Min 45 mins of Cardio: Didn’t work out from Wednesday morning until Saturday, but when I did the quality was good.

Resistance training: I know I needed to do more but got a bit ill on Thursday so I only got one day of lifting in, which I focused on my legs on Saturday and definitely am paying for it.

Recovery/Adaptation = Met Expectations

Sleep min of 7 hours per night: zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.

Conclusion: It’s great that I dropped the 2.75 pounds but there is no rational reason for me having done so, and that can’t continue. More resistance training this week and a ruthless commitment to stay away from the sugar.  Results from all of the other great folks participating in this challenge can be found at the 10 in 10 blog. Have another great week.

Are you still dedicated to your New Year's Resolution?

It’s almost March which means a full two months have passed since most of us made our annual commitment to be better people, save the world, stop smoking, find more time for friends and family or get out of debt – some of the more popular New Year’s resolutions made each and every year. For those of you that follow my blog, you know how opposed I am to the term resolution, because it is such a weak term and lacks basic accountability as evidenced by how much meaning is put behind a resolution in Congress. But hey, it’s a whole lot more catchy and less corporate than New Year’s Objective, a term which actually creates visions of drinking oneself into oblivion while hooking up with strangers at a New Years party. So New Year’s Resolution it is.

My own objective/resolution was to lose ten pounds in ten weeks, and I’ve been pretty darn dedicated to doing this including posting weekly results on my blog and being a part of the 10in10in10 Challenge. Even with my background in health and fitness, I have found this seemingly simple task quite the challenge. I’m down four pounds so far but it has been quite the yoyo experience, lose two pounds one week, gain one-and-a-half the next, and so on.

Having recently moved to NE Ohio, I have found both the good – lack of typical restaurants, and the associated calories, that I would typically frequent in NY, and the bad – Duck’s kitchen. OK, in all fairness, I have to openly admit I absolutely love Duck’s kitchen because it is incredibly warm and friendly with family members and friends stopping in at all hours of the day and night to sit down and partake of any number of delights that she has somehow constantly bakes throughout the day. I’ve often wondered to myself if this is how Mrs. Fields got started. The bad part is that the house should essentially be built out of gingerbread. There is sugar everywhere, cookies and pies on the kitchen table and counter tops, bins of cookies stacked five feet high in the family room, pancakes and waffles being made as soon as you wake up and more deserts being prepared right before you go to sleep. It’s utterly a diabetic shock waiting to happen. This is what I have to navigate through to get from the living room to the kitchen table, and again, this is not for any holiday, this is just what it looks like during the middle of any typical week and I’m not even showing the bins of cookies.

So as I’ve been going through this 10in10in10 Challenge, I have been hard pressed not to partake in any of these sugary treats and have been outstandingly successful. I think this is a positive indicator of how committed I am, this and the fact that there is a Cold Stone less than 10 minutes from my house and I haven’t been there once; alright, that’s not exactly true, I went there once but they had just closed and I didn’t have a sugar tantrum and try and break the door down as I probably would have done in past years. Long story short, once again, I have proven to myself that objectives/resolutions/goals or whatever you may call them are best achieved when they are realistic and when a clear road map to success is set out. I hope your resolutions are still top of mind for you and if not, perhaps this is yet another opportunity to get re-focused. And if that doesn’t work, just stop by Duck’s kitchen and put yourself into an insulin coma. Hey no worries, Duck can take care of monitoring that too.

The 10in10in10 Challenge – Week 6 Report (Down 1.5 or -4.0/10)

For those new to this blog, I and a bunch of other tweethletes embarked upon this year’s 10in10 challenge, with the outcome goal to lose 10 pounds in 10 weeks. This report covers progress through week 6 of 10.

How’d I do? (The Outcome Goal) Well last week I gave back all of my losses from the prior week and this week I recovered it back losing 1.5 pounds and dropping to 212.5. I’m starting to sense a pattern here and it’s not yoyo dieting, it’s yoyo weight loss – two steps forward and one step back. Losing the 1.5 pounds only took running over forty miles including a 20-miler on Friday and a seven-hour spin class on Saturday. Clearly cardio is not the issue, and while my diet wasn’t perfect, the one thing that was missing was resistance training. It’s pretty darn obvious, to even get close to reaching my objective this month, I need to hit the weights.

I use three levels of performance measures. Less than Expected, Met Expectations and Exceeded Expectations.

Less than Expected Overall, for week 6 of 10 I gave myself a self assessment of Less than Expected, mostly because the nutrition needed a lot of work and I did hardly any resistance training. Need to step it up this week.

Report Card – Week 6

February 08 – February 14:


The chart above is created using Joe’s Goals.

Caloric Intake/Nutrition = Less than Expected

Portion size: OK except for Saturday night after the Spin-a-thon and Sunday when we went to Troy’s birthday party. Pasta and salad seem to be the Ohio staples of dietary nutrition and I needed to prepare better.

Eat Healthy Breakfast: Pretty good each day.

Eat light every three hours: OK.

Eat fresh whole foods: Salads almost every day.

Avoid junk food and sugar: Cake at Troy’s birthday party threw me off a bit.

Eat protein first: Failed miserably.

Stop eating 60 mins. before going to sleep: Ate right before going to sleep almost every night.

Caloric Expenditure/Positive Stress = Less than Expected

February 08 – February 14:



Workouts captured on Buckeye Outdoors, a free online log.

Workout early: Not even close.

Min 45 mins of Cardio: No problem with the cardio this week but it wasn’t as moderate nor consistant as I would have liked. I did get used to pounding out 10 milers on the treadmill and did a 20-miler in McDonald and a 7 hour ride at the Spin-a-thon in Y-town.

Resistance training: After a great week at Equinox, I failed miserably at lifting this week.

Recovery/Adaptation = Met Expectations

Sleep min of 7 hours per night: Sleeping has not been a problem.

Conclusion: It’s great that I dropped the 1.5 pounds but it took an irrational amount of cardio to do it, an amount that I obviously can’t continue. Need to get back to basics this week.  Results from all of the other great folks participating in this challenge can be found at the 10 in 10 blog. Have another great week.

What should I wear? A Clothing Log for Cold Weather Running

It’s too damn hot for a penguin to be just walkin’ around here. I gotta send him back to the South Pole. – Billy Madison

Winter running is not something that should be dreaded or avoided. In fact, some of the most memorable runs you will ever have may be on a snow-covered trail, running past icy streams and snow-covered lakes. Winter running can be as serene and pure as running ever gets. But winter running can also present a host of issues for the uninformed, uninitiated or the stubborn.

On February 10, 2010, I co-hosted episode 68 of The Runner’s Round Table where we discussed Cold Weather Running, it’s opportunities, it’s risks and how runners can prepare themselves to enjoy this whitest of seasons. A number of questions were asked during the episode specifically about what to wear. I encourage you to listen to this episode either by subscribing on iTunes or listening through your computer.

Cold is both personal and subjective. While 40F may be cold for those running in Los Angeles, it’s down right balmy for those running in New England. Therefore the recommendations that follow are based on my reality.

The best thing you can do is create a gear log of your running wardrobe that documents what you wear under a variety of conditions and includes commentary about whether you were too hot, too cold, too wet or too chilled. This information will be valuable for years to come and can finally take the guess work out of running in the cold.

Below is an example of a clothing log that you can adapt for your own circumstances and preferences. Click on each of the orange hyperlinks for photos of various outfits for the described conditions and temperatures.

Temperature Clothing If Wet
60F+ shorts & singlet, cap, sunglasses, sunscreen, Buff to cover head if not wearing cap consider trash bag if waiting around
55-60F shorts & short-sleeved shirt or singlet, cap, sunglasses possibly wear feather-weight vest without shirt
50-55F shorts & short-sleeved shirt or singlet, cap, sunglasses, possibly lightweight gloves feather-weight vest with shirt
45-50F shorts, long-sleeved shirt or short-sleeved shirt with a shell vest, cap or fleece hat, glove liners, possibly Buff to cover neck feather-weight vest
40-45F shorts with feather-weight wind pants, long-sleeved shirt, buff to cover neck, use lip balm, polar-fleece hat, glove liners feather-weight vest or feather-weight shell
30-40F shorts with feather-weight wind pants, long-sleeved shirt with feather-weight vest, Buff to cover neck and mouth, use lip balm, polar-fleece hat, glove liners (Create barrier between cold air and breathing pathways to warm up inspired air.) feather-weight shell instead of vest, cap under polar fleece hat also consider fleece-lined vest for windy but not wet conditions
20-30F shorts with feather-weight wind pants, long-sleeved shirt with feather-weight shell jacket, Buff to cover neck and mouth, use lip balm, polar-fleece hat, convertible running mitts over glove liners cap under polar fleece hat
10-20F briefs with wind panel with feather-weight wind pants OR briefs with wind panel under running tights, thicker long-sleeved shirt with lite-weight running jacket, Buff to cover neck and second Buff to cover mouth and nose and mouth, use lip balm, polar-fleece hat, convertible running mitts over thicker running gloves cap under polar fleece hat
0-10F briefs with wind panel with heavier tights OR briefs with wind panel under light-weight tights under wind pants, thicker long-sleeved shirt with lite-weight running jacket, Buff to cover neck and second Buff or neoprene facemask to cover mouth and nose and mouth, use lip balm, polar-fleece hat, convertible running mitts over thicker running gloves, consider hand warmers cap under polar fleece hat
-0F Stay in car until the last moment, get out and run when the gun goes off or run starts, forget waiting around for medals and drive home. Get under covers and stretch. No one recognizes anyone in these temperatures anyway. trash bags, cap under polar fleece hat
0-20F Lower Cost Alternative Use items you already have laying around. Ski hat with scarf to protect face, sunglasses, hooded sweat shirt, athletic jacket, sweat pants, wind-proof gloves and possibly mittens with whatever technical gear you have worn underneath closest to your skin. 0-20F Lower Cost Alternative with reflectors for running at night or in lower visibility conditions

It’s important to remember that you don’t need to buy a ton of expensive gear to run in the cold. It’s most important to cover your head to minimize heat loss, protect your breathing areas (e.g., mouth, nose, neck), and external appendages or exposed areas that have a tendency to freeze (e.g., fingers, toes, ears, eyes). You can accomplish this with the clothes you already have. Yes it may mean that the articles won’t be feather-weight or ideal, but it shouldn’t deter you from getting out there and enjoying the roads.

Hope you’ll add your own thoughts and recommendations below in the comment area.

Time sensitive! Do you look like you should be on the cover of Runner's World Magazine?

A major brand is looking for talent between the ages of 18-29 that is hip and attractive and is the role model of running form that can represent them in a print advertising campaign. Now I know all of you fit the bill, but take a look at the details first and then remember that good intentions are worthless without action, so get on it!

Here’s what you need to do:

Make sure you are available and that you meet the qualifications in this message.

Find a great picture of you, preferably running. E-mail that picture with your contact info and confirmation of your availability to Craig with a brief sentence letting him know that you really are a runner. Telling him that you are associated with Race with Purpose will do that as well.

  • Audition dates: Feb 15-16 at Chelsea Piers by appointment
  • Shoot dates: TBD/First week of March/2 days

Be Awesome and collect all the benefits and see yourself in print

It’s that easy ;-) OK it’s not easy but I’m teeing up the opportunity for you, you need to run with it.

Tweet me or throw a comment on here letting me know you did it and how it went. I’m looking forward to seeing your mug and legs on a billboard near me.

Good luck!

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
RUNNERS w/STYLE  for  ATHLETIC BRAND PRINT
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
TYPE: PRINT �RUNNER"
CLIENT:  Major Athletic Brand
PHOTOGRAPHER: Jason Nocito
USAGE:  2 Years Global all usage, but paid placement advertising.
(Possible option for Billboard, see additional rate)
RATES:  $1500+20% FLAT (Both Shoot Dates & usage)
(Pre-Agreed Client Optional Rate for Billboard purchase: $1000+20 additional)
SHOOT DATES: Week March 1st (TBD, 2 Days)
SHOOT LOCATION: NYC
CASTING: Impossible Casting NYC
AUDITION:  Monday 2/15 & Tues. 2/16 (BY APPOINTMENT ONLY)
AUDITION LOCATION: Chelsea Studios, Manhattan
SEEKING: RUNNERS!
Male or Female/ 17-20/ All Ethnicities/ Must be ABLE TO RUN. Fairly hip style, but not over the top or too conservative.
NOTE: talent CANNOT play any high school or college level sports as it is against contractual rules to pay school athletes.
SUBMIT ELECTRONICALLY � VIA EMAIL
Name, Contact Number, PHOTOS (Include Snapshots, and if you have runner photos.) Please confirm that you're available for audition dates & shoot week.
EMAIL TO: submit@impossiblecasting.com
SUBJECT: RUNNERS (for Major Athletic Brand )  & YOUR NAME
Frozen Penis Syndrome, Lederhosen and Tassel Hats, and Barefoot Snow Running – Tonight on The Runners Roundtable

There is no such thing as bad weather, only weak people. — Bill Bowerman

Winter running is not something that should be dreaded or avoided. In fact, some of the most memorable runs you will ever have may be on a snow-covered trail running past icy streams and snow-covered lakes. Winter running can be as serene and pure as running ever gets. But winter running can also present a host of issues for the uninformed, uninitiated or the stubborn.

Currently, with those of us on the east coast of the United States braving Round 2 of Snowmageddon and our friends on the west coast doing their best to stay dry in the cold winter rains, we felt this was a perfect time to host an open forum on the topic of cold weather running.

Tonight, Wednesday, February 10th at 6PM EST, join expert runners Josh “Speedysasquatch” Maio, Justin “Mango” Manganaro, and Bill “I’ll try anything once” Risch as we discuss everything you’d want to know about how to safely enjoy running through the most beautiful season of the year. Join us at The Runner Round Table.

You can participate live by calling (724) 444-7444, Code: 34812, or by joining us in the chat room at TalkShoe where you can ask questions of the hosts and chat with other participants.

We plan on covering a variety of topics beyond what you’d ordinarily expect, including:

  • How to avoid freezing your face off
  • Protecting your peas and carrot – or frozen penis syndrome
  • When to give in to the dreadmill
  • Running on ice and snow
  • Playing nice with cars and trucks that can’t see you and can’t stop
  • Building a temperature-sensitive running wardrobe
  • Frozen lungs
  • Lederhosen and tassel hats
  • Winter trail etiquette
  • Handling conditions that are cold, wet, windy, dark or all of the above
  • and more…

And if you want to feel confident in your hosts’ ability to speak on this subject, here is some early footage of SpeedySasquatch and Mangorunner as children proving once again that a Sasquatch can make a Mango cry.

See you all at The Table. We’ll leave you with this wise advice from the Suburban Lawns:

All action is reaction
Expansion
Contraction
Man the manipulator

Underwater
Does it matter
Antimatter
Nuclear reactor
Boom boom boom boom

I guess everything’s irrelative

I’m a janitor
Oh my genitals
I’m a janitor
Oh my genitals
Oh my genitals
I’m a janitor

Get your butt off the couch and LET'S TRAIN! – Triathlete's Coffee Shop is Monday at 8PM EST

Triathlon season is just around the corner and before you know it you’ll be racking your bike and walking to the swim start. How well you will do is largely dependent upon properly planning your season and then executing that plan. This Monday evening at 8:00PM EST, yours truly will be co-hosting The Triathlete’s Coffee Shop with an episode dedicated to planning your perfect 2010 triathlon season. I will be joined by Race with Purpose triathlon coach Javier Gomez, Justin “Mango”, and professional triathlete and head coach of Team Continuum, John Hirsch. Special guests will also include my friend and USC Triathlon Head Coach Rad Hallman, and more.

You will not want to miss this episode as we’re going to provide you with the opportunity and the tools to put your 2010 plan together in a way that will help you to achieve and exceed your goals. This episode is for triathletes of all levels and experiences from first timers all the way to veteran Ironman finishers.

Post your questions in advance or bring them with you to the show. You can participate by listening to the show live by calling (724) 444-7444 code: 32637, or through your computer over the TalkShoe webcast. At TalkShoe, you’ll also be able to ask questions electronically and chat with other listeners and tri-tweethlete community members. Click here to access the TalkShoe Page.

In the meanwhile, if you have great tools and tips that others can benefit from, post them here as a comment. You can also reach all of us on Twitter at any time by following @mangorunner, @crash_gomez, @j_hirsch, @radhallman, and @coachadam. We’ll meet up with you Monday night at The Triathlete’s Coffee Shop.

With the new Schwinn AC Performance Bikes, Spin instructors may finally have to learn how to ride outside

This past weekend, I drove through the Snowmageddon in Ohio to show up at 7am on Saturday morning for the Spin-a-thon at the Central YMCA in Youngstown. Long story short, the Spin-a-thon was first postponed and then rescheduled for next Saturday. As with every challenge, this presented a new opportunity as I got to hang out with the organizers of the ride and got to try out the new Schwinn AC Performance bikes on a four-hour indoor ride of my own. At first glance this bike looks like an enhanced version of their Schwinn NXT, with more hand positions and a computer console. However, upon closer examination, this bike is a true departure from the traditional group indoor cycling bike and brings us much closer to the set up of a road bike on a trainer. To be specific, the AC Performance Bike has the following new features:

  • Aero and road handlebar positions – more realistic
  • Stem length adjustment – better individual bike fit
  • Virtual Contact Resistance technology – magnetic resistance instead of the friction resistance created with felt pad and spring – smoother ride
  • Road saddle – more adjustments and truer to outdoor bike
  • M-Power performance console – a computer that measures power through wattage – can finally measure how much work you are actually doing

I’m sure there are other differences but these were the one’s that drew my attention. The biggest change by far is that the bike is no longer a fixie, meaning that when you stop pedaling, the front wheel keeps spinning. If you are still confused, on your old spin bike when you stopped pedaling the front wheel stopped also as it was directly connected or “fixed” to your pedals. What this means in practice is that with these new bikes you lose the benefit of the big flywheel helping to pull your legs around through momentum, and more importantly it means that if you are used to standing up and running during your workout, this will no longer be a break for you or easy to do.

Those with experience in the old bikes will feel a “hitch” when trying to stand and pedal. This is not a hitch, but simply the fact that your pedlas are no longer directly connected to your wheel in a one-to-one relationship. You’ll really need to drop your body weight and spin using both legs together and raise the resistance considerably to maintain a seamless spin while standing. Essentially you’ll have to do a “freeze” the entire time you are standing up. If you don’t ride outside, you’ll probably think something is wrong with the bike. If you do ride outside you already know what I’m talking about, it’s like trying to stand up and pedal on a flat road or downhill when there isn’t enough gearing or resistance under you.

The impact of this is that instructors who have been credentialized or certified as indoor cycling instructors with no outdoor riding experience will need to by necessity have to adjust their rides to be more life-like. No longer will they be able to teach a ride that bears little resemblance to an outdoor ride with instructors wearing tennis shoes and standing up in Position 2 (a standing run) for the majority of the ride and calling it a cycling workout. Personally, I’m very pleased about this turn of events.

This also creates the potential for a much tougher ride in a number of ways. If your butt hurt while riding in class before it may really give you issues now because with the previous fixed gear bikes you could stand up more often to get a both a breather for your lungs and your butt, and equally you would get the benefit of distributing more of your weight to your feet even while seated because you had built-in resistance to press against. With a free wheel to put more weight or to stand up on your pedals, you’ll have to a) wear clipless pedals and cleats, and b) add significant resistance to the bike to simulate riding uphill.

I’m not opining on which bike provides a “better” workout, because that depends upon your specific workout, I’m just saying that for the same workout on two different bikes, these AC Performance Bikes will kick your tush. I think that traditional indoor fitness cycling enthusiasts will absolutely hate these bikes, and roadies and triathletes will be thrilled that they finally can do a sport-specific indoor workout without having to drag their own bike inside on a trainer.

So should you buy one for yourself? Jury’s out on this but if I’m correct in understanding the price to be around $3,000 for one of these bikes, in my humble opinion, for $3,000 I could stick my own bike on an awesome Computrainer, add surround sound and a killer flat screen and still have enough to buy some chocolate milk when I’m done. You can read more about these bikes at Indoor Cycle Instructor.com.

The 10in10in10 Challenge – Week 4 Report (Down 1.5 or -4.0/10)

For those new to this blog, I and a bunch of other tweethletes embarked upon this year’s 10in10 challenge, with the outcome goal to lose 10 pounds in 10 weeks. This report covers progress through week 4 of 10.

How’d I do? (The Outcome Goal) This week closes out the first month of the year and I’m excited that with all of the ups and downs I succeeded in losing an additional 1.5 pounds bringing my total loss for the month to 4 pounds for a current weight of 212.5 pounds. I weigh myself at the same time of the week and the same time of the day right before I workout in the morning. The amusing thing is how much weight I lose when measured after a workout of only one hour. After today’s workout I dropped from 212.5 to 208 pounds. What I like about it is that the post workout weight makes a great target for the next week’s pre-workout weigh in.

I use three levels of performance measures. Less than Expected, Met Expectations and Exceeded Expectations.

Met Expectations Overall, for week 4 of 10 I gave myself a self assessment of Met Expectations, recovering from last week’s slide and got myself back on track. And I was definitely concerned because I know that the sins of one week definitely carry over to the next. So this result even though it may not seem big from a magnitude standpoint, was pretty pleasing to me.

Report Card – Week 4

January 25 – January 31:


The chart above is created using Joe’s Goals.

Caloric Intake/Nutrition = Met Expectations

Portion size: Much better, the only poor day I had was Sunday evening when I splurged on CPK and tried both their fish tacos and had my traditional Halloween pizza.

Eat Healthy Breakfast: Are you kidding me. Being in New York this week, our friend Carolyn provided us with fresh squeezed juice every morning. We even took up the daily ritual entitled, “Guess the secret ingredient”, which included lime, cactus fruit, pineapple, ginger, apple, and others depending on the day.

Eat light every three hours: Much better at this as well.

Eat fresh whole foods: I throw the daily fresh juice into this category as well as great salads almost every day.

Avoid junk food and sugar: Pretty good except for an ice cream party on Saturday night that accompanied the game “Apples to Apples” with a whole slew of characters in the old neighborhood.

Eat protein first: Still difficult to get enough isolated protein to make this work.

Stop eating 60 mins. before going to sleep: Nah, we stayed up late and crashed by necessity.

Caloric Expenditure/Positive Stress = Met Expectations

January 25 – January 31:


Workouts captured on Buckeye Outdoors, a free online log.

Workout early: Not really but it didn’t hurt my ability to get my workouts in.

Min 45 mins of Cardio: Had a great week in this area primarily because my friend Kamal secured a pass for me to workout at Equinox in Scarsdale. Special thanks go out to Anthony Cichessi, the manager over there who couldn’t have been more helpful and generous. I really took advantage of both the Stairmasters (4600 PT) and the Gauntlets (SM916) as we don’t have access to either of those machines back here. I also adjusted my training schedule for the Los Angeles Marathon a bit so that I could run 20 miles in 18 degrees with my good friend Phil at Rockies on Saturday. And I have to say that the result of that run was very encouraging. By the way, help me wish good luck to Phil who’s running his first stand alone marathon in Austin, TX next Sunday.

Resistance training: Again, I took advantage of the access to Equinox to lift most every day I could.

Recovery/Adaptation = Met Expectations

Sleep min of 7 hours per night: I slept a lot.

Conclusion: A solid week that resulted in only a pound and a half of weight loss but put me back on schedule in almost all of the right areas. Good job. Results from all of the other great folks participating in this challenge can be found at the 10 in 10 blog. Have a great week.

Need to realize the benefits of business transformation, customer experience and social networking in your business? Look no further than your local gym.

Do you workout with a trainer in your local gym? Do you see trainers working out with other members and think, hey that’s the life, they get paid to boss their clients around and count to 8 or is it 10 or sometimes 12? How hard can it be to get paid to workout all day while getting free massages from their attractive and fit colleagues? And how many of you look at these trainers and think, they must have been jocks in high school or maybe college and yes they know how to lift weights and live an active lifestyle, but they can’t possibly be any more vapid or one dimensional? On the one hand I can’t argue with any of these statements, after all, I was a full-time trainer and I did it for over ten years back in the 80′s and 90′s in Los Angeles, and I did count to ten and boss my clients around and worked out multiple times each day. And yes, I even got free back massages from attractive and fit colleagues while getting paid to do so.

On the other hand, I always felt just a little bit embarrassed back then because we didn’t have “real” jobs, had a bad taste in my mouth when people would roll their eyes at me or my friends when we’d tell them what we did for a living. “Gigolo Job” was what it was most commonly referred to as. And hey maybe it was, but in that little community of trainers, greatness emerged. And I feel proud to have been part of a group of the smartest, dedicated and most determined group of human beings I’ve ever worked with. It was here at Sports Club/LA that I learned that we were not in the service business, we were in the experience business. It was also here at Sports Club/LA that I learned about transformation and how transformation is not defined in terms of effort or desire but in terms of measurable results, or benefits that are sustainable over time.

For the past fourteen years, I’ve worked at PricewaterhouseCoopers in Los Angeles and New York and during that time, I constantly worked to pass those simple messages on, sometimes with success but more often than not it was quite the struggle. Many of the folks I worked with saw my background in exercise science as less valid than those with degrees in accounting, engineering or business. At best it was met with a sense of amusement. Their lack of ability to grasp the concepts of creating experiences that delight and measuring their performance by the performance of their clients isn’t because the people there aren’t as smart or dedicated, to the contrary, PricewaterhouseCoopers professionals are razor sharp, some even brilliant. The issue is that the system rarely supports thinking in those terms; the dominant drivers of chargeability and billability run directly in the face of creating an end result that truly delights and is sustainable.

I love that social networking and customer experience and business transformation are all now “hot topics” in business today. We were doing all of those things thirty years ago and it didn’t require an initiative or a center of excellence or an investment request to do so. It’s just what we did. I love that there are businesses like The Human Performance Institute that has an incredibly successful business helping executives realize that performance is not created through finding more time to work but rather by putting more energy into the time that you have, by achieving a dynamic and holistic balance in all areas of your life, by getting the most out of your physical, mental, spiritual and emotional energy. Duh, that’s private training 101.

What amuses me is that all of these tenets were so clear and obvious to us back in that gym in Los Angeles and while business schools and multi-nationals companies search for and pay six figure salaries to executives who can help them to achieve even a modicum of success in these areas, all they had to do was look down the street to the gym on the corner. Because every day, dedicated trainers across the country and throughout the world are delivering on all of those promises, many without even knowing these are issues out in the “real” world. In that gym on the corner, clients are walking out the door transformed, they have received experiences that delight, they are a part of a vibrant and positively contagious community and they refer their friends to that business establishment and trainer every chance they get. And how many businesses wouldn’t love to achieve those metrics? Over the next few posts, I’m going to do what I’ve wanted to do for years but never did, profile some of the trainers I had the honor and pleasure to work with, those that just might change the way you think about private trainers from now on.

But don’t be too in awe just yet, I’ll let you in on another secret; we never actually did keep count when you were lifting, we just always relied on the fact that you didn’t. Three more. Or is it four?